Equal Pay Day is being recognized all month long in markets and industries around the world.

This year, Canada marked April 9 as the day the average (white) woman has to work into 2019 to earn what an average man did in 2018. The US acknowledges Equal Pay Day a week earlier on April 2. For Indigenous women or women of colour in both countries, the gap is much wider. Latina women in the US, for example, earn only 53% when compared with men’s earnings.

This isn’t a problem just in North America. In every market, at every level, men are out-earning women. Even at the very start of careers the pay gap exists. It’s not a huge discrepancy, but a gap nonetheless. As women rise up the corporate ladder, the wage gap widens. A 2019 report found that female executives in Canada earn 68% of male executive’s earnings. That’s about $950,000 less in pay a year.

It’s not all on you

With Equal Pay Day comes a flurry of new statistics to assess the wage gap between men and women. This year, a few markets and industries have reported meager progress in closing the gap. In others there’s evidence progress has come to a stalled, and in the case of the US, the gap has widened ever so slightly – from 81.1% of men’s earnings in 2017 to 81.8% in 2018.

With these new statistics comes larger reports that try to explain why the gap exists and what can be done to fix it. As they do, these reports, often ignore or minimize the real impacts of the motherhood penalty. They also continue to place blame on women themselves. It seems women aren’t doing enough. We aren’t negotiating when we have the opportunity, and when we do, we just aren’t good enough to get a better deal.

Negotiate like a pro

That’s not always true. Today’s interview guest, Ashley Paré, CEO and Founder, Own Your Worth, says that women very much are negotiating for salaries and advocating for career-advancing opportunities. The problem is they get fewer yeses than men.

That’s because companies and managers remain bias toward women. Women are often offered lower starting salaries than men. Mothers even less. Managers, too, are less willing to negotiate with the women on their teams.

Yet, that doesn’t take women fully off the hook. If you talk to enough women as Ashley does, there remains a lot of fear around negotiating. Some of it a result of the penalties women have faced from negotiating in the past.

Join my conversation with Ashley and learn:

  • How you can move past your negotiating fears
  • The two questions that will help you see your worth so you can go after it
  • The negotiating strategies to advocate for your career
  • How to manage tough negotiations with your partner at home

Now Ashley and I would love to hear from you. What is the one thing you are ready to go after? We challenge you to take one of Ashley’s tips to make your first move.

If you have any questions about negotiating for us, leave them in the comments below.

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